Sujit Choudhry: Expert on Comparative Constitutional Law and Transitions

To most people, there might not seem to be much of a difference between international law and comparative law. To be sure, the two fields are strongly linked, with the field of comparative law not coming into its own until after the Second World War. However, there is an important distinction. While international law is concerned with legal frameworks governing the relationships between independent states, comparative law seeks to understand the differences between legal systems. The aim of the field is to gain a deeper understanding of modern legal systems, improve them, and in some cases seek to unite the systems in some way.

Sujit Choudhry is a dean and professor of Comparative Law at the University of California Berkeley. He heads up the Center of Constitutional Transitions at Berkeley, the world’s first research center devoted exclusively to the study of constitution building. Dean Choudhry is especially interested in how the process of developing a constitution relates to the political process surrounding war and conflict. Before joining the law school at Berkeley, he was a full professor at both NYU and the University of Toronto.

Dean Choudhry holds degrees in law from Oxford, Harvard, and the University of Toronto. In addition to having been a Rhodes Scholar, he clerked for Chief Justice Antonio Lamer of Canada’s Supreme Court. In 2010, he was selected by the Canadian government as a Trudeau Fellow, Canada’s highest honor for researchers and academics. He has worked as a consultant abroad as a constitutional expert with the United Nations, the World Bank, and other international organizations. He is also on the board of several prestigious law journals and a manuscript reviewer for several university presses. While a student at Harvard, he was selected as as a Fulbright Scholar, and was the recipient of the Frank Knox Memorial Fellowship.

Read more about Sujit Choudry at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sujit_Choudhry